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21 September 2008 @ 04:01 pm
How sleazy banks made me pay their bad debt  
US Government took $700B of bad debts from private banks.



That's $2333 for every inhabitant of the US (300M population).
My household impact is $11667 (for 5 people).
 
 
 
(Deleted comment)
Dennis Gorelikdennisgorelik on September 26th, 2008 12:29 am (UTC)
This loss is not terrible, but unpleasant.

Besides, this is a distraction: instead of focusing on decreasing spendings and lowering taxes, government focuses on bailing out financial companies that screwed up.
(Deleted comment)
Dennis Gorelikdennisgorelik on September 26th, 2008 04:06 am (UTC)
Government tends to screw up almost everywhere, not only in finance and healthcare.
If government tries to regulate some industry, then such industry almost always stagnates.

Here's one of the recent examples:
Larry Page explains how FCC uses government power to prevent us from having better Internet


zhenkinzhenkin on October 9th, 2008 05:38 pm (UTC)
Hm. And who are these "idiots"? :-)
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zhenkinzhenkin on October 9th, 2008 07:04 pm (UTC)
You are avoiding answering the question. So who are those idiots that the government is willing to save. I am just trying to understand what you were trying to say. :-) Was that about certain patients?
(Deleted comment)
zhenkinzhenkin on October 9th, 2008 07:23 pm (UTC)
Or that's what it is....I happen to be Jewish too and I get that all too often from my friends. It's just that I can't express my opinion on something when I don't know what that something is. :-) Ladno, doloi eto zanudstvo.
Healthcare ohrenenno slozhnaya vesch. U menya naschet nee net edinogo zakluchitelnogo menniya, est tolko raznie mysly.
(Deleted comment)
zhenkinzhenkin on October 9th, 2008 07:42 pm (UTC)
C'mon. Being Jewish is not all that bad. U get to know all the geeky Jewish boys that later become Google founders and fly their own jets.:-) Or , at least, have "MD" or "Esq" attached to their names on business cards.
I remember once riding a T-train (Boston Metro) and talking to my dentist friend about the procedure he just did on me. After he got off, a young Jewish woman asked me with a seductive smile if I was in a dental program. After I told her that:" no, I am in a software business", her interest faded away quicker that I could say my name. It was like a light bulb going off. Man, we are a material culture. :-)
(Deleted comment)
zhenkinzhenkin on October 9th, 2008 07:55 pm (UTC)
Well, I was married too. But unfortunately to a Jewish lady... and her mother :-(. That was something else. :-(
So what are the advantages of dating a rich Jewish dude? Do you feel rich too by association? ;-)
(Deleted comment)
zhenkinzhenkin on October 9th, 2008 08:03 pm (UTC)
I was joking. I think people are much more than just their race, nationality, amount of money that they have and so on. Unfortunately, not everybody can see even through money. People sometimes may hate you or be jealous of you just because u have a bit more cash. Not that you stole it from anybody....
(Deleted comment)
zhenkinzhenkin on October 9th, 2008 08:12 pm (UTC)
Forgive me asking (perhaps this is a bit personal), but was that decision a consequence of what happened to you in your last marriage ?
(Deleted comment)
(no subject) - zhenkin on October 9th, 2008 08:20 pm (UTC) (Expand)
Dennis Gorelikdennisgorelik on October 9th, 2008 11:29 pm (UTC)
Do you mean that you are divorced already?
Dennis Gorelikdennisgorelik on October 9th, 2008 11:31 pm (UTC)
I think you overgeneralize:

If one non-Jew husband sucked that doesn't mean that all non-Jews suck as husbands.

If one geeky guy was good in bed that doesn't mean that all geeky guys are good in bed.
Dennis Gorelikdennisgorelik on October 9th, 2008 07:27 pm (UTC)
Would you like to share your thoughts on Health Care?

For example, should the government increase spendings on health care or it should let people themselves decide who, when, and how much they pay for health care?

zhenkinzhenkin on October 9th, 2008 07:45 pm (UTC)
I have many. Just not one conclusive one.
I view healthcare as not only social, but economic issue. Our businesses saddled with healthcare obligations are becoming less competitive by the day. How should we deal with this, though people paying for their own insurance or with full/partial government assistance? I don't know....
Dennis Gorelikdennisgorelik on October 9th, 2008 11:26 pm (UTC)
So you have only the questions. That's ok, because I have the answers :-)

Government should probably cover the basic (read: the most needed and the least expensive) procedures for free. That would cover 80% of medical needs and would cost 20% of all medical cost.
Everything else should be paid by real customers (newly invented and expensive drags, cancer treatments, expensive surgeries etc.


zhenkinzhenkin on October 10th, 2008 01:24 pm (UTC)
I actually agree with that a lot. I think we should also do the following(although controversial):
1. Invest somehow in the prevention of chronic illnesses(statistics shows that like 5 of of 7 most popular chronic conditions cost the most amount of money for us)
2. Perhaps increase premiums for people that neglect their health ( like the ones that do not do anything about excessive weight - because it leads to again , chronic conditions)
BTW, there was a book released recently called "Grand New Party", which has some pretty interesting ideas about a lot of these things.
http://www.amazon.com/Grand-New-Party-Republicans-American/dp/0385519435/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1223645069&sr=8-1
zhenkinzhenkin on October 9th, 2008 05:45 pm (UTC)
One camp - the free marketeers - says let 'em crash and burn, the market will separate the fit from the weak. The other camp - the interventionists - says that the great depression happened exactly because government didn't do crap.

The terrible thing is that economics doesn't seem to be the same kind of precise science as math or physics, but feels a bit more like astrology. :-)

It would all be ok if we could experiment with either approach without endangering our livelihoods. But alas, the stakes are super high.
So which theory should we bet on? :-)
Dennis Gorelikdennisgorelik on October 9th, 2008 07:16 pm (UTC)
If we don't know what to do -- it's safer not to make very expensive bets on anything.
Even if we don't solve the problem, at least we won't make it worse.


zhenkinzhenkin on October 9th, 2008 07:24 pm (UTC)
Well, Dennis, inaction is unfortunately is also a kind of action. Is it the right think to act by not acting? :-)
Dennis Gorelikdennisgorelik on October 9th, 2008 07:28 pm (UTC)
If you don't know what to do -- doing nothing is usually the best option.
Another option -- do a little in order to test new approaches.
zhenkinzhenkin on October 9th, 2008 07:46 pm (UTC)
I think this is what Paulson and Co. Will do. They are not eager to go ahead and spend 700B in a week.
Dennis Gorelikdennisgorelik on October 9th, 2008 11:28 pm (UTC)
I hope they won't. But almost always government spends all allocated money :-(

It could be better if private business run the experiments.